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Get Involved

There are many opportunities to get involved and contribute to the Museum’s mandate. Learn more about how you can contribute to THM and our work through specialized programs and volunteering.

Young Professionals

Opportunities for Holocaust education and commemoration specially designed for people in their 20s and 30s

Young Adults interacting with Holocaust survivor, Max Eisen, Neuberger HEW 2019 Legacy Symposium. Photo by Focal Cadence for the Toronto Holocaust Museum.

The Museum offers dynamic and engaging opportunities for Holocaust education and commemoration geared towards people in their 20s and 30s. Through a wide array of offerings, we develop unique programs for young adults to engage with this important history in meaningful ways. This includes programming situated around commemorative dates such as Yom Hashoah and our signature Legacy Symposium during Neuberger Holocaust Education Week. In addition to lectures and film screenings, we curate intimate and specially tailored events for this demographic throughout the year. Contact us to learn more and find out how you can get involved.

 

More information on how you can get involved and upcoming programs coming soon!

Dialogue for Descendants

Specialized programming and educational opportunities for children of Holocaust survivors and their partners

Holocaust survivor, Yael Spier Cohen, and her son, Simeon, at the Holocaust Education Centre's 30th anniversary gala. Photo by Michael Rajzman for the Toronto Holocaust Museum.

The Museum’s Dialogue for Descendants (D4D) committee provides specialized programming and educational opportunities for children of Holocaust survivors and their partners. Launched in 2016, D4D features its signature annual program during the Neuberger Holocaust Education Week plus other dynamic and meaningful programs throughout the year. Connect with us to learn more about the D4D committee and their specialized programs.

 

Stay-tuned for updates on specialized D4D programming coming soon!

Volunteer

Support THM's mandate by becoming a volunteer

Volunteers at Neuberger Holocaust Education Week 2019. Photo by Focal Cadence for the Toronto Holocaust Museum

Volunteers are vital to our operations and are important members of our community. They support THM’s mandate by providing a welcoming and engaging environment while raising public awareness about the Holocaust and issues related to antisemitism and genocide. Learn more about the available opportunities and apply below.

 

Please note:

We welcome applications year-round, however, the intake of new volunteers is currently closed. Due to the high volume of inquiries we receive, we ask you to apply below to be added to our waitlist. We will contact you when opportunities become available.

  • Front Desk Volunteers welcome and check in school groups and visitors and process admissions using a point of sale (POS) system. They provide information to visitors both in person and over the phone and promote upcoming THM events and programs. Front Desk Volunteers facilitate the safekeeping of coats and bags and distribute iPads to visitors for the museum’s interactive tours. As part of their role, they politely enforce gallery rules and communicate any issues that may arise to a staff member.

     


     

    Requirements

     

    • Experience with computers and iPads is an asset.
    • Some prior experience in a public-facing role
      Comfortable interacting with the public and school groups.
    • Must keep up to date with Museum programs, content, and events.
    • Able to work as a team under the direction and supervision of staff
      Commitment: We ask that all Front Desk Volunteers commit to at least two shifts per month for a minimum of a year.
  • Museum Guide Volunteers are positioned throughout the THM’s gallery space on rotation. They answer general questions, assist with wayfinding, and engage in conversation with visitors about the THM’s history, content, and collection. The role may include some light cleaning to ensure that artifact cases and digital monitors are kept dust-free. They support the safety and preservation of the Museum’s collection by politely enforcing gallery rules and communicating any issues that may arise to a staff member. Please note: Occasionally, Museum Guides may need to support the Front Desk. Training on Front Desk procedures will be provided.

     


     

    Requirements

    • Some prior experience in a public-facing role
    • Comfortable with public speaking and engaging in discussion with visitors
    • Previous experience with iPads is beneficial
    • Must keep up to date with museum programs, content, and events
    • Able to work as a team under the direction and supervision of staff
    • Commitment: We ask that all Gallery Guide Volunteers commit to at least two shifts per month for a minimum of one year.
  • The Toronto Holocaust Museum holds a variety of special events and programming throughout the year. Special Programs Volunteers may assist in a variety of roles from attendee registration to wayfinding. Duties may change depending on the type of event, and details are always provided in full beforehand. They communicate any issues that may arise to a staff member.
    Please note: Events usually take place outside of regular operational hours, during the evening, or on weekends.

     


     

    Requirements

     

    • Some prior experience in a public-facing role
    • Comfortable interacting with the public
    • Previous experience with computers and iPads is beneficial
    • Must keep up-to-date with the Museum’s programs and events
    • Flexibility to work evening and weekend events
    • Able to work as a team under the direction and supervision of staff
    • Commitment: We ask that Special Programs Volunteers commit to at least two shifts per month for a minimum of a year. Note: this is dependent on how many events and programs run each month.

Careers at the Toronto Holocaust Museum

Museum Educator

The Museum Educator will engage groups in discussion-based programming that unpacks the lessons of the Holocaust in meaningful and relevant ways for today’s learners. S/He will have the ability to teach and lead a variety of groups ranging in age from upper elementary to high school from a diversity of backgrounds including public, Catholic, private and Jewish day schools; and adult groups.